Events


 
Special Events:

20 Jun 2016, Markman Ellis, ‘A Tea Drinking Nation: How Britain Came to Identify Itself with a Migrant Alien in the Early Eighteenth Century’, The Immigrants of Spitalfields Festival, Hanbury Hall, London

09 Dec 2015, Markman Ellis, ‘The British “Way of Tea”: Culture and Consumption in Eighteenth-Century Britain’, Isle of Wight Historical Association, Riverside Centre, Newport, IoW

05 Jun 2014, Markman Ellis, ‘Tea and the Tea Ceremony in Georgian England’, Chelsea Fringe at the Geffrye Museum, Hackney,

18 Feb 2014, Markman Ellis, ‘Tea and the Tea Ceremony in Georgian England’, Dilettanti Society at the Medical Society, London

Sep 2011 / Mar 2012, Markman  Ellis and Jennifer Wood, History of tea and Bohea tasting, Canton Tea Company at Petersham Nurseries, Richmond

16 Feb 2011, Markman Ellis,  ‘The Tea-Table Research Project’, Launch Colloquia, Centre for Studies of Home, Geffrye Museum, London

12 Jan 2010, Markman Ellis,  ‘The Philosopher at the Tea-Table’, Inaugural Lecture, Queen Mary University of London


 
Conferences:

05 Mar 2016, Richard Coulton, ”A Tea-Drinking People’: Fashioning the National Drink of Modern Britain’, Domesticating the Exotic, Exoticising the Domestic: Global Movements of Goods and Practices c.1750-1850, Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of York

29 Jul 2015, Panel: ‘Tea: Commodity, Knowledge, and Culture Between Britain and China in the Eighteenth Century’, ISECS International Congress, Rotterdam, Netherlands:

  • Matthew Mauger, ‘All the Tea in China: Tea’s British Marketplaces’
  • Richard Coulton, ‘A Mysterious Exotic: Tea in Discourses of Natural History and Medicine’
  • Markman Ellis, ‘Scripting the British Way of Tea’

4 Jun 2015, Markman Ellis, ‘A Most Civilizing Juice’: Tea between China and Britain in the Eighteenth Century’, Coffee, Tea and Chocolate: Fuelling Modernity, Postgraduate & Early Career Workshop, Eighteenth-Century Worlds Research Centre, University of Liverpool

18 May 2015, Markman Ellis, ‘Tea as an Object of Knowledge between Britain and China, 1690-1730’, Explorations, Encounters, and the Circulation of Knowledge, UCLA Center for 17th & 18th Century Studies and the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA

8 Jan 2015, Richard Coulton, ‘Cheering the Whole Land’: The Democratisation of Tea-Drinking, 1770-1840′, Modern Languages Association of America Annual Conference, Vancouver, Canada

8 Jan 2015, Matthew Mauger, ‘Tea and the Politics of Empire: the Cultivation of Imperial Ambition’, Modern Languages Association of America Annual Conference, Vancouver, Canada

6 Jan 2010, Panel: ‘Tea and the Tea-Table in Eighteenth Century England’, BSECS Annual Conference, St Hugh’s College Oxford:

  • Ben Dew, ‘The Politics of Tea in Britain and America’
  • Matthew Mauger, ‘Smugglers and Gaugers: tea and taxation in mid-eighteenth century England’
  • Richard Coulton, ‘The Business of the Natural History of Tea’


 
Research Seminars:

26 Apr 2014, Richard Coulton and Matthew Mauger, ‘How did Tea become the National Drink: Tea in British Culture and Society from a Historical Perspective’, Tea, Trade, and British Wealth, the UK Group of the Foundation of German Business

11 Oct 2012, Markman Ellis,  ‘Women, the Tea-Table, and the Public Sphere’, Dept of English Graduate Lecture, Birkbeck University of London

23 Feb 2011, Markman Ellis,  ‘Women, the Tea-Table and the Public Sphere’, Dept of English Research Seminar, University of Southampton

11 Nov 2009, Markman Ellis, ‘Consumption: the Culture and Criticism of Tea’, Eighteenth-Century Graduate Seminar, English Faculty, University of Cambridge.

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